A comparison of pretravel health care, travel-related exposures, and illnesses among pediatric and adult U.S. Military beneficiaries

David P. Ashley, Jamie Fraser, Heather Yun, Anjali Kunz, Mary Fairchok, David Tribble, Indrani Mitra, Mark D. Johnson, Patrick W. Hickey, Anuradha Ganesan, Robert G. Deiss, Tahaniyat Lalani*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated differences in pretravel care, exposures, and illnesses among pediatric and adult travelers, using a prospective, observational cohort. Eighty-one pediatric travelers were matched 1:1 with adult military dependents by travel region, destination’s malaria risk, and travel duration. Pediatric travelers were more likely to have coverage for hepatitis A and B (90% versus 67% of adults; 85% versus 44%), visit friends and relatives (36% versus 16%), report mosquito bites (69% versus 44%), and have close contact with wild or domesticated animals (40% versus 20%) than adults (P < 0.05). Subjects < 10 years of age were less likely to be prescribed antibiotics (28% versus 95%; RR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.46–0.85) and antidiarrheals (9% versus 100%; RR = 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03–0.29) for travelers’ diarrhea (TD) self-treatment than adults. Travel medicine providers should emphasize strategies for vector avoidance, prevention of animal bites and scratches, and TD self-treatment in pediatric pretravel consultations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1285-1289
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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