A narrative review of the prevalence and risk factors associated with development of knee osteoarthritis after traumatic unilateral lower limb amputation

Shawn Farrokhi, Brittney Mazzone, Adam Yoder, Kristina Grant, Marilynn Wyatt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Young military Service Members with traumatic unilateral lower limb amputations may be at a high risk for developing knee osteoarthritis (OA). There is growing evidence for potential influence and predictive value of nonsystemic risk factors on development and progression of primary knee OA in older adults. Proposed factors include chronic knee pain, obesity, abnormal knee joint mechanics, muscle weakness, previous knee trauma, and altered physical activity level. However, there is limited information available regarding whether such nonsystemic risk factors could also be responsible for the increased risk of knee OA after traumatic, unilateral lower limb amputation in young military Service Members. The purpose of this narrative review is to compile and present evidence regarding prevalence of nonsystemic and potentially modifiable knee OA risk factors in Service Members with traumatic, unilateral lower limb amputation, and to identify potential strategies for intervention. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed in July 2015 using structured search terms related to nonsystemic risk factors for knee OA. Results: Current collective evidence does suggest an elevated prevalence of the nonsystemic knee OA risk factors in young military Service Members with unilateral lower limb amputation. In conclusion, the present state of the literature supports that young military Service Members with traumatic unilateral lower limb amputations may be at increased risk for developing knee OA compared to nonamputees. Military Service Members injured at a young age have a long life expectancy, and thus require comprehensive rehabilitation programs to prevent or delay progression of knee OA. Given the lack of strong evidence, further clinical research is needed to determine whether early identification and modification of nonsystemic risk factors for knee OA could optimize long-term function and quality of life in young Service Members after traumatic, unilateral, limb amputations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume181
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

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