A qualitative study of factors influencing the decision to have an elective amputation

Deanna L. Quon*, Nancy L. Dudek, Meridith Marks, Michael Boutet, Lara Varpio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Some patients with a functionally impaired lower limb choose to have an elective amputation, whereas others do not. Functional outcomes do not favor either type of treatment, making this a complex decision. The experiences of patients who have chosen elective amputation were analyzed to identify the key factors in this decision-making process. Methods: Patients from a tertiary care amputee clinic who had chosen to undergo elective amputation of a functionally impaired lower limb participated in the present study. A qualitative research design involved the use of one-on-one semi-structured interviews, which were audio recorded and transcribed. Narrative analysis was used by three researchers to provide triangulation. Recurrent key themes and patterns were described. Personal factors in the decision-making process were identified. Results: Factors that had the largest impact on the decision-making process were pain, function, and participation. Body image, self identity, and the opinions of others had little influence. Satisfaction with the surgical outcome was related to how closely the result matched the patient's expectations. Patients who were better informed prior to surgery had more realistic expectations about living with an amputation. Conclusions: The severity of pain and the desire for improved function are strong drivers for patients deciding to undergo elective amputation of a functionally impaired lower extremity. While patients do not want others' opinions, information regarding life with an amputation helps to set realistic expectations regarding outcome. Clinical Relevance: Health-care professionals can assist patients facing this decision by providing realistic information regarding life with an amputation. Connecting these patients to peers with amputations can supplement information provided by professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2087-2092
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery
Volume93
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

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