Assessing the Clinical Utility of a Wearable Device for Physiological Monitoring of Heart Rate Variability in Military Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury

Jay M. Uomoto*, Nancy Skopp, Michael Jenkins-Guarnieri, Josh Reini, Drew Thomas, Robert J. Adams, Megan Tsui, Shaun R. Miller, Beverly R. Scott, Paul F. Pasquina

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Autonomic dysfunction has been implicated as a consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Heart rate variability (HRV) may be a viable measure of autonomic dysfunction that could enhance rehabilitative interventions for individuals with TBI. This pilot study sought to assess the feasibility and validity of using the Zeriscope™ platform system in a real-world clinical setting to measure HRV in active-duty service members with TBI who were participating in an intensive outpatient program. Methods: Twenty-five service members with a history of mild, moderate, or severe TBI were recruited from a military treatment facility. A baseline assessment was conducted in the cardiology clinic where point validity data were obtained by comparing a 5-min recording of a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) output against the Zeriscope platform data. Results: Compared with the ECG device, the Zeriscope device had a concordance coefficient (rc) of 0.16, falling below the standard deemed to represent acceptable accuracy in HR measurement (i.e., 0.80). Follow-up analyses excluding outliers did not significantly improve the concordance coefficient to an acceptable standard for the total participant sample. System Usability Survey responses showed that participants rated the Zeriscope system as easy to use and something that most people would learn to use quickly. Conclusions: This study demonstrated promise in ambulatory HRV measurement in a representative military TBI sample. Future research should include further refinement of such ambulatory devices to meet the specifications required for use in a military active-duty TBI population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1496-1504
Number of pages9
JournalTelemedicine and e-Health
Volume28
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • heart rate variability
  • military service members
  • telemedicine
  • traumatic brain injury
  • wearable sensor

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