Association of bacterial colonization at the time of presentation to a combat support hospital in a combat zone with subsequent 30-day colonization or infection

Robert L. Kaspar, Matthew E. Griffith, Paul B. Mann, Devon J. Lehman, Nicholas G. Conger, Duane R. Hospenthal, Clinton K. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

U.S. casualties have developed multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections. A surveillance project to evaluate U.S. military patients for the presence of MDR pathogens from wounding through the first 30 days of care in the military healthcare system (MHS) was performed. U.S. military patients admitted to a single combat support hospital in Iraq during June-July of 2007 had screening swabs obtained for the detection of MDR bacteria and a subsequent retrospective electronic medical records review for presence of colonization or infection in the subsequent 30 days. Screening of 74 U.S. military patients in Iraq found one colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Fifty-six patients of these were screened for Acinetobacter in Germany and one found colonized. Of patients evacuated to the U.S., 9 developed infections. Carefully obtained screening cultures immediately after injury combined with look-back monitoring supports the role of nosocomial transmission. Consistent infection control strategies are needed for the entire MHS. Reprint and

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)899-903
Number of pages5
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume174
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

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