Deployment-related Respiratory Issues

Michael J. Morris, Frederic A. Rawlins, Damon A. Forbes, Andrew J. Skabelund, Pedro F. Lucero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Military deployment to Southwest Asia since 2003 in support of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn has presented unique challenges from a pulmonary perspective. Various airborne hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents. These exposures may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and in some instances development of chronic lung disease. While increased respiratory symptoms during deployment are well documented, there is limited data on whether inhalation of airborne particulate matter is causally related to an increase in either common or unique pulmonary diseases. While disease processes such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia and exacerbation of preexisting asthma have been adequately documented, there is significant controversy surrounding the potential effects of deployment exposures and development of rare pulmonary disorders such as constrictive bronchiolitis. The role of smoking and related disorders has yet to be defined. This article presents the current evidence for deployment-related respiratory symptoms and ongoing Department of Defense studies. Further, it also provides general recommendations for evaluating pulmonary health in the deployed military population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-178
Number of pages6
JournalU.S. Army Medical Department journal
Issue number2-16
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Deployment-related Respiratory Issues'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this