Depression and Social Stigma Among MSM in Lesotho: Implications for HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention

Shauna Stahlman*, Ashley Grosso, Sosthenes Ketende, Stephanie Sweitzer, Tampose Mothopeng, Noah Taruberekera, John Nkonyana, Stefan Baral

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social stigma is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) across Sub-Saharan Africa, and may influence risks for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) via its association with depression. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 530 MSM in Lesotho accrued via respondent-driven sampling. Using generalized structural equation models we examined associations between stigma, social capital, and depression with condom use and testing positive for HIV/STIs. Depression was positively associated with social stigma experienced or perceived as a result of being MSM. In contrast, increasing levels of social cohesion were negatively associated with depression. Social stigma was associated with testing positive for HIV; however, this association did not appear to be mediated by depression or condom use. These data suggest a need for integrated HIV and mental health care that addresses stigma and discrimination and facilitates positive social support for MSM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1460-1469
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Depression
  • HIV
  • MSM
  • Social stigma

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Depression and Social Stigma Among MSM in Lesotho: Implications for HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this