Does intracranial pressure management hurt more than it helps in traumatic brain injury?

Charles A. Adams, Deborah M. Stein, Jonathan J. Morrison*, Thomas M. Scalea

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death after traumatic injury. Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is particularly associated with poor TBI outcomes, prompting clinicians to monitor this parameter, using it to guide therapies aimed at reducing pressures. Despite this approach being recommended by several bodies such as the Brain Trauma Foundation and the American College of Surgeons, the evidence demonstrating that ICP-guided therapy improves outcome is limited. The topic was debated at the 36th Annual Point/Counterpoint Acute Care Surgery Conference and the following article summarizes the discussants points of view along with a summary of the evidence.Level of Evidence Level III.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere000142
JournalTrauma Surgery and Acute Care Open
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

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