Early implementation of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery training using a simulation-based mastery learning curriculum

Christopher Dyke*, Brenton R. Franklin, W. Brian Sweeney, E. Matthew Ritter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: After the American Board of Surgery announcement of the Flexible Endoscopy Curriculum requirement in 2014, we implemented a dedicated endoscopy rotation at the post graduate year (PGY)2 level including a simulation curriculum for Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery skills. Here we evaluate the outcomes of this implementation. Methods: Beginning in 2015, we developed a clinical endoscopy and simulation-based rotation to prepare for Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery testing. Originally, our curriculum was based on the published Texas Association of Surgical Skills Laboratories curriculum using the GI Mentor and transitioned to a mastery learning curriculum using the Endoscopy Training System in 2016. We evaluated the success of the curriculum in terms of first-time pass rates, training time required, and comparison to previously published benchmarks based on clinical experience. Results: Since 2015, a total of 37 general surgery residents in our program were Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery tested (PGY2 = 24, PGY3 = 4, PGY5 = 9); 84% (31) completed the Endoscopy Training System curriculum. At the time of testing, 73% (27) had performed <25 esophagogastroduodenoscopies, and 46% had performed <25 colonoscopies. Ninety-two percent (34) spent 10 hours or less completing the curriculum. The first-time pass rate for those completing the Endoscopy Training System curriculum was 97% vs 67% for those not completing the Endoscopy Training System curriculum (P = .01). For residents completing the Endoscopy Training System curriculum, total Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery scores were discernibly higher (472 vs 389, P < .01), as were 3/5 task scores (Nav1 80 vs 67, P = .02; Loop2 36 vs 8, P = .02; Retro3 89 vs 71, P = .02). Despite clinical inexperience (<25 esophagogastroduodenoscopies and <50 colonoscopies), PGY2s yielded a mean score of 454 and a pass rate of 92%. This was similar to PGY5s (427, 89%; P = .3) and compares to benchmark data of endoscopists with >300 cases. Conclusion: Early implementation of flexible endoscopy training with a simulation-based curriculum results in Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery performance equal to a clinical experience not often gained during surgical residency. Often requiring <10 hours, this represents a fantastic return on investment for this training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1228-1233
Number of pages6
JournalSurgery
Volume169
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

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