Efficacy of an adjustable oral appliance and comparison with continuous positive airway pressure for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

Aaron B. Holley*, Christopher J. Lettieri, Anita A. Shah

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We sought to establish the efficacy of an adjustable oral appliance (aOA) in the largest patient population studied to date, to our knowledge, and to provide a comparison with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Methods:We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients using an aOA. Results of overnight polysomnography with aOA titration were evaluated and compared with CPAP. Predictors of a successful aOA titration were determined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results:A total of 497 patients were given an aOA during the specified time period. The aOA reduced the mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) to 8.4 ± 11.4, and 70.3%, 47.6%, and 41.4% of patients with mild, moderate, and severe disease achieved an AHI < 5, respectively. Patients using an aOA decreased their mean Epworth Sleepiness Score by 2.71 (95% CI, 2.3-3.2; P <.001) at follow-up. CPAP improved the AHI by -3.43 (95% CI, 1.88-4.99; P <.001) when compared with an aOA, but when adjusted for severity of disease, this difference only reached significance for patients with severe disease (-5.88 [95% CI, -8.95 to -2.82; P <.001]). However, 70.1% of all patients achieved an AHI < 5 using CPAP compared with 51.6% for the aOA(P <.001). On multivariate analysis, baseline AHI was a significant predictor of achieving an AHI < 5 on aOA titration, and age showed a trend toward significance. Conclusions:In comparison with past reports, more patients in our study achieved an AHI < 5 using an aOA. The aOA is comparable to CPAP for patients with mild disease, whereas CPAP is superior for patients with moderate to severe disease. A lower AHI was the only predictor of a successful aOA titration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1511-1516
Number of pages6
JournalChest
Volume140
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Efficacy of an adjustable oral appliance and comparison with continuous positive airway pressure for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this