Frequency and spectrum of mutations across 94 cancer predisposition genes in African American women with invasive breast cancer

Leann A. Lovejoy, Seth K. Rummel, Clesson E. Turner, Craig D. Shriver, Rachel E. Ellsworth*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

African American women are at increased risk of being diagnosed at a young age and/or with triple negative breast cancer, both factors which are included in current guidelines for identifying women who may benefit from genetic testing. Commercial breast cancer predisposition genetic panels, based largely on data derived from women of European ancestry, may not capture the full spectrum of cancer predisposition genes associated with breast cancer in African American women. Between 2001 and 2018, 488 unselected African American women with invasive breast cancer enrolled in the Clinical Breast Care Project. National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Hereditary Cancer testing criteria version 1.2020 were applied to determine genetic risk. Targeted sequencing was performed using the TruSight Cancer panel and variants classified using the ClinVar database. Using NCCN criteria, 64.1% of African American women would be eligible for genetic testing. Fifty pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were detected in 19 genes with the highest frequencies in BRCA2 (29.4%) and BRCA1 (15.7%). Mutation frequencies in test-eligible and test-ineligible women were 13.1% and 3.5%, respectively. One-third of women harbored variants that could not be classified. While these data do not suggest a need to expand current commercial gene panels, NCCN criteria would fail to identify 12.5% of African American women with mutations in hereditary cancer predisposing genes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-187
Number of pages7
JournalFamilial Cancer
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African American
  • Breast cancer
  • Genetic testing
  • Hereditary

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