HIV DNA Set Point is Rapidly Established in Acute HIV Infection and Dramatically Reduced by Early ART

on behalf of the RV217 and RV254/SEARCH010 study groups

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

176 Scopus citations

Abstract

HIV DNA is a marker of HIV persistence that predicts HIV progression and remission, but its kinetics in early acute HIV infection (AHI) is poorly understood. We longitudinally measured the frequency of peripheral blood mononuclear cells harboring total and integrated HIV DNA in 19 untreated and 71 treated AHI participants, for whom 50 were in the earliest Fiebig I/II (HIV IgM −) stage, that is ≤ 2 weeks from infection. Without antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV DNA peaked at 2 weeks after enrollment, reaching a set-point 2 weeks later with little change thereafter. There was a marked divergence of HIV DNA values between the untreated and treated groups that occurred within the first 2 weeks of ART and increased with time. ART reduced total HIV DNA levels by 20-fold after 2 weeks and 316-fold after 3 years. Therefore, very early ART offers the opportunity to significantly reduce the frequency of cells harboring HIV DNA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-72
Number of pages5
JournaleBioMedicine
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute HIV infection
  • Art
  • HIV DNA
  • Persistence
  • Reservoir

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