Introduction to department of defense research on burn pits, biomarkers, and health outcomes related to deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan

Timothy M. Mallon*, Patricia Rohrbeck, Kevin M. Haines, Dean P. Jones, Mark Utell, Philip K. Hopke, Richard P. Phipps, Douglas I. Walker, Thomas Thatcher, Collynn F. Woeller, Coleen P. Baird, Harvey B. Pollard, Clifton L. Dalgard, Joel C. Gaydos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This paper provides an overview of our study that was designed to assess the health impact of environmental exposures to open pit burning in deployed troops. Methods: The rationale for the study and the structure of the research plan was laid out. An overview of each article in the supplement was provided. The cohort of deployed Service members was assessed for airborne exposure, relevant biomarkers, and health outcomes following deployment to Balad, Iraq, and/or Bagram, Afghanistan. Results: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposures were elevated, and serum biomarkers were statistically different postdeployment. Associations were noted between PAHs and dioxins and microRNAs. Some health outcomes were evident in deployers compared with nondeployers. Conclusions: Future research will examine the associations between demographic variables, smoking status, biomarker levels, and related health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S3-S11
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number8S
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

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