Life Expectancy after Treatment of Metastatic Bone Disease: An International Trend Analysis

Davis L. Rogers, Micheal Raad, Julio A. Rivera, Rikard Wedin, Minna Laitinen, Michala S. Sørensen, Michael M. Petersen, Thomas Hilton, Carol D. Morris, Adam S. Levin*, Jonathan A. Forsberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction:The decision to treat metastatic bone disease (MBD) surgically depends in part on patient life expectancy. We are unaware of an international analysis of how life expectancy among these patients has changed over time. Therefore, we asked (1) how has the life expectancy for patients treated for MBD changed over time, and (2) which, if any, of the common primary cancer types are associated with longer survival after treatment of MBD?Methods:We reviewed data collected from 2000 to 2022 in an international MBD database, as well as data used for survival model validation. We included 3,353 adults who underwent surgery and/or radiation. No patients were excluded. Patients were grouped by treatment date into period 1 (2000 to 2009), period 2 (2010 to 2019), and period 3 (2020 to 2022). Cumulative survival was portrayed using Kaplan-Meier curves; log-rank tests were used to determine significance at P < 0.05. Subgroup analyses by primary cancer diagnosis were performed.Results:Median survival in period 2 was longer than in period 1 (P < 0.001). Median survival (at which point 50% of patients survived) had not been reached for period 3. Median survival was longer in period 2 for all cancer types (P < 0.001) except thyroid. Only lung cancer reached median survival in period 3, which was longer compared with periods 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). Slow-growth, moderate-growth, and rapid-growth tumors all demonstrated longer median survival from period 1 to period 2; only rapid-growth tumors reached median survival for period 3, which was longer compared with periods 1 and 2 (P < 0.001).Discussion:Median duration of survival after treatment of MBD has increased, which was a consistent finding in nearly all cancer types. Longer survival is likely attributable to improvements in both medical and surgical treatments. As life expectancy for patients with MBD increases, surgical methods should be selected with this in mind.Level

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E293-E301
JournalThe Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Mar 2024
Externally publishedYes

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