Metals and breast cancer

Celia Byrne, Shailaja D. Divekar, Geoffrey B. Storchan, Daniela A. Parodi, Mary Beth Martin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

152 Scopus citations

Abstract

Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Endocrine disruptors
  • Estrogen receptor
  • Estrogens
  • Metalloestrogens
  • Metals

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