Military telehealth: A model for delivering expertise to the point of need in austere and operational environments

Jeremy C. Pamplin*, Konrad L. Davis, Jennifer Mbuthia, Steven Cain, Sean J. Hipp, Daniel J. Yourk, Christopher J. Colombo, Ron Poropatich

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Austere clinical environments are those in which limited resources hamper the achievement of optimal patient outcomes. Operational environments are those in which caregivers and resources are at risk for harm. Military and civilian caregivers experience these environments in the context of war, natural disasters, humanitarian assistance missions, and mass casualty events. The military has a particular interest in enhancing local caregiver capabilities within austere and operational environments to improve casualty outcomes when evacuation is delayed or impossible, reduce the cost and the risk of unnecessary evacuations, enhance the medical response during aid missions, and increase combat effectiveness by keeping service members in the fight as long as possible. This article describes military telehealth as it relates to care in austere and operational environments, and it suggests implications for policy, particularly with respect to the current emphasis on telehealth solutions that might not be feasible in those settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1386-1392
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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