ORL emergencies boot camp: Using simulation to onboard residents

Sonya Malekzadeh*, Kelly M. Malloy, Eugenia E. Chu, Jared Tompkins, Alexis Battista, Ellen S. Deutsch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: Incoming otolaryngology residents are expected to triage and manage airway, bleeding, and other emergencies with little prior experience. Simulation-based education has become increasingly important as it provides tools to develop psychomotor skills and judgment early in residency, using realistic experiences while eliminating patient risk. We hypothesize that a Boot Camp course emphasizing basic otolaryngology management will increase participants' confidence and be perceived as useful in developing their knowledge, technical skills, self-confidence, and improving clinical performance, both immediately and 6 months following the course. Study Design: Survey. Methods: A 1-day Boot Camp was developed consisting of six technical skills stations (mask ventilation, intubation, flexible laryngoscopy, microlaryngoscopy/bronchoscopy, epistaxis control, and cricothyroidotomy); a session involving telephone inquiry triage, and two complex airway scenarios addressing medical management and emphasizing team leadership. Residents completed questionnaires before, immediately, and 6 months following course completion. Results: Thirty residents enrolled, 27 participated in the course, and 24 completed all three surveys. Previous experiences and confidence levels were variable; 26 of 30 (87%) identified emergency airway management as a concern before attending the course. A Fisher's exact test demonstrated improved confidence (P <.05) for every skill. An overwhelming majority of participants agreed or strongly agreed the intervention was useful in developing their knowledge, technical skills, self-confidence, and improving clinical performance. Conclusions: An intensive, simulation-based Boot Camp addressing airway, bleeding, and other otolaryngology emergencies was successful in improving junior otolaryngology residents' confidence and was perceived as useful in developing knowledge, technical skills, self-confidence, and improving clinical performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2114-2121
Number of pages8
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume121
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Boot Camp
  • Simulation
  • education
  • resident
  • self-confidence
  • skills

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