Prolonged Lenalidomide Therapy Does Not Impact Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization and Collection in Multiple Myeloma Patients: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis: A. J. Cowan et al

Andrew J. Cowan, Philip A. Stevenson, Damian J. Green, Sherilyn Tuazon, Edward N. Libby, Mary Kwok, Sarah Lee, David G. Coffey, Ajay K. Gopal, Leona A. Holmberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since the introduction of lenalidomide into induction therapy for multiple myeloma (MM), there have been conflicting reports about its impact on autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization. We evaluated the impact of previous lenalidomide exposure in a large cohort of patients with MM undergoing mobilization and collection at a tertiary stem cell transplantation center. We hypothesized that collection of PBSCs is feasible even with a prolonged duration of previous lenalidomide therapy. We examined patients with MM who attempted stem cell mobilization and collection, seen at our center between January 2012 and July 2015. The patients were categorized into 3 groups for analysis: (1) patients with previous receipt of >6 cycles lenalidomide, (2) patients with previous receipt of ≤6 cycles of lenalidomide, and (3) patients without previous lenalidomide exposure. We compared collection yields and days of apheresis among the 3 groups using linear regression analysis. We identified 297 patients with MM who underwent mobilization of PBSCs. Of these, 35 had received >6 cycles of lenalidomide (median, 8 cycles; range, 7 to 25 cycles), 156 had received ≤6 cycles of lenalidomide (median, 4 cycles; range, 1 to 6 cycles), and 106 had received no lenalidomide. Prior lenalidomide exposure did not have a statistically significant impact on the absolute number of CD34+ cells collected or on the duration of collection based on a multivariate linear regression analysis for association between receipt of >6 cycles of lenalidomide. In this retrospective analysis of MM patients undergoing autologous PBSC transplantation, we show that the duration of previous lenalidomide exposure does not impact the total number of PBSCs collected or the number of days of apheresis. These data suggest that longer courses of induction therapy with lenalidomide-containing regimens to achieve a maximum response can be safe without impairing the ability to collect PBSCs, and that limiting lenalidomide use before mobilization does not appear warranted in all cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)661.e1-661.e6
JournalTransplantation and Cellular Therapy
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apheresis
  • Lenalidomide
  • Mobilization
  • Myeloma

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