Race and overall survival in men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the Department of Defense Military Health System, 1990–2010

Melannie Alexander, Kangmin Zhu, Jennifer Cullen, Celia Byrne, Derek Brown, Stephanie Shao, Jennifer Rusiecki*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In the U.S. general population, black men experience poorer survival after prostate cancer (CaP) diagnosis compared to white men, and findings may be impacted by unequal access to healthcare. The objective of the study is to investigate racial differences in overall survival (OS) among Department of Defense beneficiaries diagnosed with CaP. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted utilizing the Automated Central Tumor Registry within the Military Healthcare System, a system designed to provide equal access. Men diagnosed with primary prostate adenocarcinomas between 1990 and 2010 [n = 18,484; 24% Non-Hispanic black (NHB), 76% Non-Hispanic white (NHW)] were followed through 2013 for vital status. Unadjusted Kaplan–Meier estimation curves and multivariable Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression models were used to examine racial differences in OS. Results: Age-specific Kaplan–Meier analyses showed equivalent OS for NHW and NHB men in all age groups, except for 75+, where NHB had poorer OS (p = 0.0048). Multivariable Cox PH models revealed no significant differences in OS for race (HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.95–1.08), except in men aged ≥ 75 years, where NHB men had poorer OS (HR 1.27; 95% CI 1.08–1.49). Conclusions: Findings suggest that in a healthcare system designed for equal access, disparities in OS among men diagnosed with CaP may not exist.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)627-635
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Equal access
  • Prostate cancer
  • Racial disparities
  • Survival

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