Rates of microbiologically diagnosed infection and pathogen detection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients

Lauren E. Lee, Alice E. Barsoumian, Alexander W. Brown, Michael A. Wiggins, John S. Renshaw, Michael B. Osswald, Clinton K. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Infections remain a significant cause of mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Evaluations of causes of infection are often unrevealing, and at some sites, increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance have been noticed. We performed a retrospective analysis of infection rates and microbiologic testing yield, or percent of tests ordered to diagnose an infection, in the first 100 days of 30 allogeneic and 56 autologous stem cell transplants performed at San Antonio Military Medical Center from July 2011 to April 2014. Blood stream infections were diagnosed in 11.6% with a yield of 6%. Urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 2.3% with a yield of 3%. Clostridium difficile infections were diagnosed in 9.3% and testing yield was 6%. Incidence of respiratory viruses was 5.8% with 4 rhinoviruses/enteroviruses and 1 influenza virus identified. One Proteus mirabilis urinary isolate was an extended spectrum beta-lactamase producer. Five patients, 13% of allogeneic and 4% of autologous patients, died within the first 100 days post-transplantation. History of bacteremia was present in 60% of patients who died; however, only one died due to a microbiologically diagnosed infection. Improved diagnostic tests and methods are needed to increase yield of detection of infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1685-e1691
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume181
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

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