Recommendations for Population-Based Applications of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study: Position Statement by the American College of Preventive Medicine

Kevin M. Sherin*, Audrey J. Stillerman, Laxmipradha Chandrasekar, Nils S. Went, David W. Niebuhr

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Childhood adversity profoundly influences health, well-being, and longevity. Prevention and interventions to mitigate its harmful effects are essential. The American College of Preventive Medicine reviewed the research literature and other professional and governmental statements about adverse childhood experiences to support the development of evidence-based and population-focused recommendations about prevention, screening, and mitigation interventions for childhood adversity. Methods: We performed an umbrella review to find, assess and synthesize the evidence from systematic reviews focused on 3 key questions: the prevention or mitigation of the effects of adverse childhood experiences; the association of screening for adverse childhood experiences with various benefits, including health outcomes; and the effectiveness and harms of interventions in individuals with elevated adverse childhood experience scores. Adverse childhood experience‒related recommendations from 6 professional and governmental organizations were also reviewed. On the basis of these reviews, the American College of Preventive Medicine developed a position statement through consensus. Results: A total of 8 systematic reviews, including 260 studies in total, were identified and combined with adverse childhood experiences‒related recommendations from 6 professional organizations to support the American College of Preventive Medicine recommendations. The American College of Preventive Medicine offers 7 adverse childhood experiences‒related recommendations focused on screening, education/training, policy/practice, and research: 2 are evidence-based, and 5 are based on expert opinion. Notably, regarding secondary prevention of adverse childhood experiences, the American College of Preventive Medicine endorses population-level surveillance and research around childhood adversity but not adverse childhood experience screening in individual clinical encounters. Conclusions: Despite limitations in the heterogeneity and quality of the published systematic reviews, the extant literature supports the American College of Preventive Medicine recommendations. Interventions to enhance protective factors and prevent and mitigate the consequences of adverse childhood experiences and other childhood adversity are promising and require further implementation and research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100039
JournalAJPM focus
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ACEs
  • childhood adversity
  • position statement
  • prevention recommendations
  • protective factors
  • umbrella review

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Recommendations for Population-Based Applications of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study: Position Statement by the American College of Preventive Medicine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this