Review article: Gastrointestinal infections in deployed forces in the middle east theater: An historical 60 year perspective

Mark S. Riddle*, Stephen J. Savarino, John W. Sanders

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Infectious diarrhea has been among the most common maladies of military deployments throughout time. The U.S. military experienced a significant burden from this disease in the middle eastern and north African campaigns of World War II (WWII). This article compares patterns of disease experienced in WWII with the recent military deployments to the same region for Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). Remarkable similarities in the prevalence and risk factors were noted, which belie the assumed improvements in prevention against these infections. In both campaigns, peaks of diarrhea occurred shortly after arrival of new personnel, which were seasonally associated and were linked to initial lapses in field sanitation and hygiene. It is important to reassess current strategies, especially, in light of emerging evidence of the chronic sequelae of these common infections to include a reemphasis on or reexamination of vaccine development, rapid field diagnostics, treatment algorithms, and antimicrobial prophylaxis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-917
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume93
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Nov 2015
Externally publishedYes

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