Sage wisdom or anecdotal dictum? Equivalent opioid use after open, laparoscopic, and robotic inguinal hernia repair

Rowan R. Sheldon*, Woo S. Do, Jessica B. Weiss, Dominic M. Forte, Vance Y. Sohn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Purported benefits of minimally-invasive inguinal hernia repair techniques include less postoperative pain, but objective data is lacking. We analyzed prescribing habits and opiate requirements to provide an objective comparison. Methodology: Inguinal hernia repairs performed on patients aged 18–65 from October 2016 through February 2018 were examined. Patients with prior opiate use or complicated operative courses were excluded. Discharge prescriptions, morphine milligram equivalents(MME), and additional prescriptions within three months were evaluated. Results: 173 patients met criteria including 90 open(OMR), 34 laparoscopic(TEP), and 49 robotic(RTAPP) repairs. There was no difference in age or gender. There was no difference in average opiate prescriptions(OMR 230 MME, TEP 229 MME, RTAP 208 MME; p = 0.581), percentage prescribed acetaminophen(OMR 96.7%, TEP 97.1%, RTAPP 98.0%; p = 0.910), or percentage prescribed NSAIDs(OMR 43.3%, TEP 44.1%, RTAP 46.9%; p = 0.919). On follow up, there was no difference in repeat opiate prescriptions(OMR 10.0%, TEP 8.8%, RTAPP 8.2%; p = 0.934). Conclusions: Patients undergoing open, laparoscopic, and robotic inguinal hernia repairs showed no evidence of differing pain medication requirements. The implication that minimally-invasive techniques cause less pain may be inaccurate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-842
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume217
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

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