Self-reported mild TBI and postconcussive symptoms in a peacetime active duty military population: Effect of multiple TBI history versus single mild TBI

Kelly J. Miller*, Brian J. Ivins, Karen A. Schwab

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential cumulative impact of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) on postconcussive symptoms. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 224 active duty soldiers reporting MTBI within 1 year of testing. For 101, this MTBI was their only reported traumatic brain injury (TBI); 123 had sustained at least 1 additional MTBI during their lifetime. A No TBI control group (n = 224) was included for comparison. MAIN MEASURE: Self-report symptoms data via questionnaire. Within time since injury subgroups (≤3 months; Post-3 months), symptom endorsement (no symptoms, 1 or 2 symptoms, 3+ symptoms) among soldiers with 1 MTBI was compared with that of soldiers with 2 or more MTBIs. Injured soldiers 14; symptom endorsement was compared with that of soldiers who had not sustained a TBI. RESULTS: Among the recently injured (≤3 months), those with 2 or more MTBIs endorsed significantly more symptoms than those with 1 MTBI: 67% of soldiers with 2 or more MTBIs reported 3+ symptoms, versus 29% of One MTBI soldiers. Among Post-3 month soldiers, there were no significant differences between MTBI groups. Overall, soldiers with MTBI endorsed significantly more symptoms than those without TBI. CONCLUSION: Past experience of MTBI may be a risk factor for increased symptom difficulty for several months postinjury. Clinicians should ascertain lifetime history of brain injury when evaluating patients for MTBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-38
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mild traumatic brain injury
  • Military
  • Multiple TBI
  • Postconcussive symptoms
  • Soldier

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Self-reported mild TBI and postconcussive symptoms in a peacetime active duty military population: Effect of multiple TBI history versus single mild TBI'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this