Sexual Dimorphism in Immunity to Oral Bacterial Diseases: Intersection of Neutrophil and Osteoclast Pathobiology

M. S. Valerio, K. L. Kirkwood*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sex is a biological variable that affects immune responses to bacterial and other types of infectious agents. Males and females are known to have differential oral bacterial disease burden in periodontal and endodontic disease. Understanding that there is a contribution from both sex and gender to these oral diseases, we discuss in this review recent sex-based findings that provide a pathobiological basis for differences observed between males and females. Sexual dimorphism of immune responses with respect to neutrophil trafficking and osteoclast differentiation and formation is presented as a plausible mechanism to explain the sexual differences. We also emphasize that sex, as a biological variable, should be considered in these types of oral immunologic studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1416-1423
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume97
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • bacterial infections
  • bone and bones
  • chemokines
  • neutrophils
  • osteoclasts
  • sex characteristics

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