Single-Center Experience With the Seraph-100® Microbind® Affinity Blood Filter in Patients With SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Septic Shock at a Military Treatment Facility

Steven Stoffel, Joshua Boster, Zachary Jarrett, Melissa Rosas, Arjun Kalra, Mai Nugyen, Michael Morris, Robert Walter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is characterized by a dysregulated inflammatory response, which may result in severe hemodynamic instability and septic shock. The Seraph-100® Microbind® Affinity Blood Filter is a commercially available extracorporeal pathogen absorbent device with the ability to bind pathogens and cytokines present within the blood. Our study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the Seraph-100® for patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and septic shock. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed to evaluate the use of the Seraph-100® blood filter at a Single Center tertiary-care facility at Brooke Army Medical Center from 2020 to 2021. Nine patients (11 treatments) were completed with the Seraph-100® blood filter in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and septic shock. The Seraph-100® blood filter was used in combination with continuous renal replacement therapy and slow low-efficiency dialysis or directly in parallel with the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit. Results: Within this cohort, there was a statistically significant improvement in the following clinical parameters comparing values to before and after treatment with the Seraph-100® blood filter: Mean arterial pressure (mmHg) (64.2 ± 2.36 vs. 76.2 ± 2.68; P < .001), heart rate (beats per minute) (128 ± 6.6 vs. 100.3 ± 6.07; P < .001), administered fraction of oxygen (%) (74.4 ± 10.58 vs. 60.3 ± 10.35; P < .001), serum lactate (mmol/L) (6.14 ± 1.25 vs. 2.8 ± 1.14; P = .0095), and pH (7.29 ± 0.03 vs. 7.39 ± 0.04; P = .0203). There were statistically significant improvements in vasopressor requirements: norepinephrine (mcg/min) (36.3 ± 4.74 vs. 8.3 ± 3.92; P < .001), vasopressin (units/min) (0.04 ± 0.004 vs. 0.02 ± 0.003; P < .001), dobutamine (mcg/kg/min) (2.3 ± 1.00 vs. 0.2 ± 0.75; P = .006) and angiotensin II (ng/kg/min) (34.5 ± 6.4 vs. 3.3 ± 5.26; P < .001). Conclusions: The use of the Seraph-100® blood filter was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements in hemodynamic parameters and decreased vasopressor requirements in patients with septic shock and SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E2670-E2674
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume188
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2023

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