SMN-deficiency disrupts SERCA2 expression and intracellular Ca2+ signaling in cardiomyocytes from SMA mice and patient-derived iPSCs

Guzal Khayrullina, Kasey E. Moritz, James F. Schooley, Naheed Fatima, Coralie Viollet, Nikki M. McCormack, Jeremy T. Smyth, Martin L. Doughty, Clifton L. Dalgard, Thomas P. Flagg, Barrington G. Burnett*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of alpha motor neurons and skeletal muscle atrophy. The disease is caused by mutations of the SMN1 gene that result in reduced functional expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN is ubiquitously expressed, and there have been reports of cardiovascular dysfunction in the most severe SMA patients and animal models of the disease. In this study, we directly assessed the function of cardiomyocytes isolated from a severe SMA model mouse and cardiomyocytes generated from patient-derived IPSCs. Consistent with impaired cardiovascular function at the very early disease stages in mice, heart failure markers such as brain natriuretic peptide were significantly elevated. Functionally, cardiomyocyte relaxation kinetics were markedly slowed and the T 50 for Ca2+ sequestration increased to 146 ± 4 ms in SMN-deficient cardiomyocytes from 126 ± 4 ms in wild type cells. Reducing SMN levels in cardiomyocytes from control patient IPSCs slowed calcium reuptake similar to SMA patent-derived cardiac cells. Importantly, restoring SMN increased calcium reuptake rate. Taken together, these results indicate that SMN deficiency impairs cardiomyocyte function at least partially through intracellular Ca2+ cycling dysregulation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16
JournalSkeletal Muscle
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 May 2020
Externally publishedYes

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