Suicide Rates among Active Duty Service Members Compared with Civilian Counterparts, 2005-2014

Carolyn A. Reimann, Edward L. Mazuchowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare military suicide rates with civilian suicide rates, adjusting for age and sex differences that exist between the two populations. The number of active component (AC) service members whose manner of death was certified as suicide was determined for specific age and sex groups for each year from 2005 to 2014. Indirect standardization was then used to determine the expected number of suicides for each age/sex group, based on the U.S. suicide rates for the corresponding age/sex groups obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Although suicide rates among U.S. active duty Service Members were found to increase between 2005 and 2009, overall age- and sex-adjusted AC suicide rates were lower than or comparable to civilian rates every year of the study period. When suicide numbers were analyzed within specific age and sex categories, there was a significant association between higher suicide incidence and AC military status for 17-29-yr-old females in 2010, 2012, and 2014, and a significant association between lower suicide incidence and AC military status for 25-49 -yr-old males in some years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-402
Number of pages7
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume183
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Military
  • civilian
  • rates
  • suicide

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