The antimicrobial resistance monitoring and research (ARMoR) program: The US department of defense response to escalating antimicrobial resistance

Emil P. Lesho*, Paige E. Waterman, Uzo Chukwuma, Kathryn McAuliffe, Charlotte Neumann, Michael D. Julius, Helen Crouch, Ruvani Chandrasekera, Judith F. English, Robert J. Clifford, Kent E. Kester

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Responding to escalating antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the US Department of Defense implemented an enterprise-wide collaboration, the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program, to aid in infection prevention and control. It consists of a network of epidemiologists, bioinformaticists, microbiology researchers, policy makers, hospital-based infection preventionists, and healthcare providers who collaborate to collect relevant AMR data, conduct centralized molecular characterization, and use AMR characterization feedback to implement appropriate infection prevention and control measures and influence policy. A particularly concerning type of AMR, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, significantly declined after the program was launched. Similarly, there have been no further reports or outbreaks of another concerning type of AMR, colistin resistance in Acinetobacter, in the Department of Defense since the program was initiated. However, bacteria containing AMR-encoding genes are increasing. To update program stakeholders and other healthcare systems facing such challenges, we describe the processes and impact of the program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-397
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Department of Defense
  • Infection prevention
  • Surveillance

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