The Intersection of HIV, Diabetes, and Race: Exploring Disparities in Diabetes Care among People Living with HIV

Karla I. Galaviz*, Rincy Varughese, Brian K. Agan, Vincent C. Marconi, Xiuping Chu, Seung Hyun Won, Anuradha Ganesan, Mohammed K. Ali, Jonathan Colasanti

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a setting of universal health care access, we compared diabetes control between Caucasians and African Americans (AA) living with HIV. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from a cohort study among military members living with HIV and diabetes. Using adjusted logistic regression models, we compared proportions of Caucasians and AA meeting the following diabetes treatment goals: hemoglobin A1c <7.0%, blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mm Hg, low density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dL, and not smoking. We included 107 Caucasian (mean age 37 years) and 126 AA (mean age 33 years) participants. A similar proportion of Caucasians and AA were prescribed diabetes (∼60%) and BP (∼80%) medications. Yet, more Caucasians met the BP treatment goal (77% [54%, 90%]) than AA (61% [36%, 82%]). Thus, more Caucasians met the combined A1c, BP, and cholesterol goals for diabetes control (25% [10%, 49%]) than AA (13% [5%, 31%]). Despite having equal access to health care, AA in this study have poorer diabetes control than Caucasians.

Keywords

  • care continuum
  • equity
  • patient care
  • race

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