Using Architecture and Technology to Promote Improved Quality of Life for Military Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury

Paul F. Pasquina*, Lavinia Fici Pasquina, Victoria C. Anderson-Barnes, Jeffrey S. Giuggio, Rory A. Cooper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Today, injured service members are surviving wounds that would have been fatal in previous wars. A recent RAND report estimates that approximately 320,000 service members may have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) during deployment, and it is not uncommon for a soldier to sustain multiple associated injuries such as limb loss, paralysis, sensory loss, and psychological damage. As a result, many military service members and their families face significant challenges returning to a high quality of independent life. The architectural concepts of universal design (UD) and evidence-based design (EBD) are gaining interest as an integral part of the rehabilitation process of veterans with TBI. This article examines the possibilities presented by UD and EBD in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, in terms of high-end building and interior design quality, and possible technological options for individuals with disabilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-220
Number of pages14
JournalPhysical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Architecture
  • Assistive technology
  • Quality of life
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Universal design

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Using Architecture and Technology to Promote Improved Quality of Life for Military Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this