Validation of the T86I mutation in the gyrA gene as a highly reliable real time PCR target to detect Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni

Nereyda Espinoza*, Jesús Rojas, Simon Pollett, Rina Meza, Lilian Patiño, Manuel Leiva, Máximo Camiña, Manuela Bernal, Nathanael D. Reynolds, Ryan Maves, Drake H. Tilley, Matthew Kasper, Mark P. Simons

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, and increasing rates of fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in C. jejuni are a major public health concern. The rapid detection and tracking of FQ resistance are critical needs in developing countries, as these antimicrobials are widely used against C. jejuni infections. Detection of point mutations at T86I in the gyrA gene by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a rapid detection tool that may improve FQ resistance tracking. Methods: C. jejuni isolates obtained from children with diarrhea in Peru were tested by RT-PCR to detect point mutations at T86I in gyrA. Further confirmation was performed by sequencing of the gyrA gene. Results: We detected point mutations at T86I in the gyrA gene in 100% (141/141) of C. jejuni clinical isolates that were previously confirmed as ciprofloxacin-resistant by E-test. No mutations were detected at T86I in gyrA in any ciprofloxacin-sensitive isolates. Conclusions: Detection of T86I mutations in C. jejuni is a rapid, sensitive, and specific method to identify fluoroquinolone resistance in Peru. This detection approach could be broadly employed in epidemiologic surveillance, therefore reducing time and cost in regions with limited resources.

Original languageEnglish
Article number518
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Jul 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Campylobacter jejuni
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • T86I
  • gyrA

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