Variables Associated with Attrition from Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Medical School

Jayne E. Stetto*, Gary D. Gackstetter, David F. Cruess, Tomoko I. Hooper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Attrition among medical students is a concern for the institution, the individual, and the profession. Disenrollment has an impact on the institution, in terms of academic reputation and resources expended, and the individual, in terms of self-esteem, personal finances, and opportunity costs. This study summarizes the results of an epidemiologic study of student attrition conducted at the only federal medical school in the United States-the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland-and describes the association between demographic and selected quantitative variables for those students who graduated or remained enrolled and those who disenrolled. Both sex (female) and a decelerated curriculum were predictive of attrition in this medical student population. The records of the students who left Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences without graduating were examined to ascertain the presence of noncognitive issues surrounding disenrollment; over one-half of the students who disenrolled left voluntarily and for nonacademic reasons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-107
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume169
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

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